New Paper – Visible and infrared photocurrent enhancement in a graphene-silicon Schottky photodetector through surface-states and electric field engineering

Spatially mapped photocurrent response from an engineered graphene/Silicon Schottky photodiode at telecommunication wavelengths showing enhancement at trench edges.

Nawapong Unsuree has had a paper accepted for publication in 2D Materials. coming from a collaboration between the Echtermeyer group (Manchester) and the Parkinson group. The research was conducted in the National Graphene Institute and the Photon Science Institute.

This new research reports the application of infrared scanning photocurrent microscopy to new devices with structured electric field, to reveal a ten-fold enhancement in photocurrent responsivity close to lateral edges.

This research paves the way towards high-sensitivity infrared photodetectors based on the graphene-silicon architecture.

Reference: Visible and infrared photocurrent enhancement in a graphene-silicon Schottky photodetector through surface-states and electric field engineering, 2D Materials, 2019, DOI: 10.1088/2053-1583/ab32f5

New Paper – Graphene-Silicon-On-Insulator (GSOI) Schottky Diode Photodetectors

Hakan Selvi has had a paper accepted for publication in RSC Nanoscale describing SOI graphene-based photodetectors. In a collaboration between the Echtermeyer group and the Parkinson group at the University of Manchester, Hakan showed that by modifying the shape and thickness of the silicon, the electrical and optical characteristics could be optimized. In particular, a near 1GHz device response was demonstrated by suppressing diffusion currents.

Reference: H Selvi, E Hill, P Parkinson and T Echtermeyer, RSC Nanoscale 2018 (10.1039/C8NR05285A)

New Paper : Towards Substrate Engineering of Graphene-Silicon Schottky Diode Photodetectors

graphene_schottkyA new paper describing the development and characterisation of high-speed Graphene-Silicon Schottky photodetectors has been published in RSC Nanoscale.

The work, led by PhD student Hakan Selvi and Tim Echtermeyer includes high-speed device characterisation performed in the Parkinson lab.

The new devices are broadband, high-speed, large-area and low-cost photodetectors which make use of the high transparancy and conductivity of graphene. These devices pave the way towards real-world applications for Graphene-Silicon detectors.

The paper is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C7NR09591K